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Foods to Avoid During Pregnancy

There is no need to avoid certain food to prevent allergies while pregnant

 

Did you know? Latest scientific research reveals there’s no need to avoid certain foods during pregnancy because you’re worried they might cause your baby to have allergies.

Monday, January 4th, 2021

If you’re allergic to any foods, you should continue to avoid eating them during pregnancy. However, some women without food allergies believe that eating certain foods (such as nuts) when they’re pregnant can cause allergies in their babies. While research on this topic is ongoing, current recommendations do not indicate the need for dietary food restrictions for women without food allergy.

So if you are healthy and not suffering from food allergies, you can safely eat the following foods without worrying about increasing your baby’s risk of developing allergies:

  • milk
  • eggs
  • fish
  • nuts
  • wheat

Of course, there are some foods that all pregnant women should avoid eating, such as raw fish, raw meat, or unpasteurized cheese. This is because of the risk of bacteria or food poisoning and has nothing to do with allergies.

Foods to Avoid During Pregnancy

 

Sources

Bunyavanich S, Rifas-Shiman S, Platts-Mills T et al. Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 133(5):1373-82.

 

Fleischer DM, Spergel JM, Assa’ad AH et al. Primary prevention of allergic disease through nutritional interventions. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013; 1:29-36.

 

Frazier AL, Camargo CA, Malspeis S et al.  Prospective study of peripregnancy consumption of peanuts or tree nuts by mothers and the risk of peanut or tree nut allergy in their offspring. JAMA Pediatr 2014; 168(2):156-62.

 

Greer FR, Sicherer SH, Burks AW, and the Committee on Nutrition and Section on Allergy and Immunology. Effects of early nutritional interventions on the development of atopic disease in infants and children: the role of maternal dietary restriction, breastfeeding, timing of introduction of complementary foods, and hydrolyzed formulas. Pediatrics 2008; 121(1):183-91.

 

www.cdc.gov

www.efsa.europa.eu

www.acog.org

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